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Jobs for Different Personality Types

it's 03 Jun, 2024 3:01 am

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Jobs for Different Personality Types

Background

This information is about the specific health area mentioned above. It comprises a combination of textual and video information, on our site and on external sites.  We will be adding new specific health areas and further information continually.

The idea is for you to understand more about the health area you are addressing before you get too far building your action plan.

General Information

Jobs for different personality types is all about understanding who you are. People often look in the mirror and don’t really see the real person staring back at them. As children we lack emotional intelligence and self awareness. It is not until much later in life we start to see the real us staring back, even then some people never do and remain delusional all their lives, preferring to live a fantasy.

Children will say; I want to be a footballer, doctor, lawyer, scientist, police person, actor. As parents we don’t want to discourage them so go along with it. As parents we should  perhaps have more insight and knowledge of what it takes to become one of those career choices. What talent, special skills, focus is needed. Importantly, have they ever show any talent or aptitude towards that chosen profession.

Talking to University students in their first year; What do you want to do with this advanced education when you have left Uni? The answer is often: I don’t know. I advise them you need to give it serious consideration so that along the education path you can use specialist course work to drive you towards a specialised area.

Then we come to personalities; if you are a dynamic, outgoing, extravert who has short attention span there is no point in becoming an accountant as you will spend most of your life with your head in accounts and you won’t gain the real benefits of your character.

So look at your personality and research roles that suit your character.  You can look at a number of personality tests in the second external info below, and we suggest you look at your personality by taking the External Questionnaire below the videos.  This will give you your MBTI personality type – four letter code.  We then provide links to a number of sites which link professions and jobs to this type.

Background Information

There is information available which will help you formulate your action plan – both on our site and on external sites.

On our site

JobDrive

This drive is for everyone whether a student, a part time worker or a senior manager. Choosing a job or career can be a difficult task no matter at what stage of life you are – it is often driven by many factors and circumstances. It all starts when we are teenagers when we are at school doing exams. “What do I want to be when I grow up?” Some teenagers are heavily influenced by their parents, surroundings, friends etc, whilst others are still unclear even when they are due to start work or when they are at University.

We have relevant information on JobDrive
PersonalityDrive

When we reach adulthood we have to take on responsibilities – one of these is often having to earn money to support your family.  This can include working – sometimes this is fulfilling, often it isn’t – it’s something we have to do to provide.

Not many people are lucky enough to work somewhere they enjoy – but a lot of it is about fitting your job to your personality and interests.  PersonalityDrive shows different types of personality, how these manifest themselves and the impact they have on our lives.

“Don’t count the days – make the days count.” – Muhammad Ali

We have relevant information on PersonalityDrive

On external site(s)

How much do you know about yourself? If you plan to live a highly satisfying work life and enjoy your work, you should choose a career that suits you best. Unfortunately, there are a lot of people who end up choosing the wrong career and frustrate themselves in the long run. Being in the wrong line of work doesn’t only ruin your professional life, but it harms your personal life as well.

So, it’s crucial to choose the right career.

But how do you choose the right career? There are a number of things that you should take into consideration to pick a career that suits you best. A lot of people end up choosing the wrong careers due to a lack of appropriate guidance and advice. You shouldn’t be one of them.

Given below are some important tips or guidelines that you should follow to choose the right career and be happy for the rest of your life.

Know Your Strengths

Every one of us has some strengths – and some weaknesses. The point is to find out what you are really good at. Are you good at telling stories? Do you find it easy to coach other writers? Do you love teaching students? There must be something that you feel passionate about and are good at doing. You need to find out what those skills and strengths are.

Create a list of skills that you have, and then pick the strongest skills from that list. Consult your friends or family for an outer perspective. If you play by your strengths, you’ll enjoy a great professional life.

Discover Your Personality Type

You might have heard about Myers-Briggs. It’s an introspective self-report questionnaire which helps you find out what type of personality you have. Different persons have different types of personalities; someone could be an introvert and someone else could be an extrovert. By knowing your personality type, you’ll be able to find out what type of work environment will suit you best.

Take a Career Test

If you are confused deciding which career is right for you, you can also go for a career test. Typically, a career test presents you with a set of questions which you need to answer in the given time-frame. A career test is aimed at assessing your skills and strengths and then suggest a career that is a good match. Once you have finished answering all the questions, you’ll be provided with 2-3 career options that suit you best and promise a satisfying life.

On the internet, you’ll find a number of career tests that you can complete within a few minutes. Many of them are free.

Seek Advice from Others

No matter where you live, you’ll always have people who are already employed, expert in a particular field or have more professional experience. Feel free to get in touch with these people and talk about your aspirations. Gather information about different occupations and industries. Ask them for advice that you can use for choosing a career that’s best for you.

Work as an Intern

Internships provide you with an excellent opportunity to lay the foundation of your career. The experience of actually working in the real world is something that you should never ignore. Working as an intern helps you find out how being in a particular job feels like, whether the work environment is up to your taste and how you get along with people in the workplace.

Internships are also highly recommended for building connections with professionals and gaining work experience that can add extra weight to a resume. An internship can be either paid or unpaid.

Careershifters have an article on how to match your personality to your career.  An extract and the links are shown below.

Matching up our personality with a suitable role is vital to a successful career change. Here, Nisa Chitakasem tries out online personality tests to see what insights they offer.

I don’t know about you, but my personality has so many facets, I still don’t know how to break it down into separate traits. And even if you do have a finely-tuned awareness of your characteristics, how do you know which jobs they’re suited to? I mean, how do you know which career is appropriate for which personality type if you only have knowledge of one or two careers?

With this in mind, I’ve been trying out a few free, online psychometric personality tests specifically targeted towards career changers. Here the links to some of my favourites.

Jung Typology Test

You take the test by answering ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to a series of statements in order to determine the combination of characteristics you possess. You’re then identified as a particular personality type based on these results. Finally, they feed back a list of suitable career options and also some educational institutions where you can receive the relevant skills training for the specific career areas.

Finding Potential: ‘Individuals’ Personality Questionnaire’

This test takes around 15 minutes to complete and gives you a 15 page report that shows you to what extent you possess certain personality traits; gives you a detailed breakdown of these traits; and then matches work preferences and possible jobs to you in accordance with which personality traits you strongly possess and which ones you don’t.

SimilarMinds.com: ‘What Career Suits Me’?

This one is slightly different. First, it asks what your ‘current or desired’ career is before the test begins properly. The test itself gives you a list of statements and you indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with each one. Based on the results, you’re identified as a certain type of person (I am an ‘Idealist’) and given a list of possible professions.

Of course, we career changers don’t base decisions solely on the results of an internet career test. But they can offer useful suggestions we hadn’t thought of, or confirm the suitability of options we were already considering. Plus, the tests themselves can be quite fun to do! Let us know how you get on with them and if there are any other ‘Idealists’ out there!

Video

Sometimes the owner of a video will not allow the video to be played on external sites.  If you see the video is unavailable on the left just click the ‘WATCH NOW’ link on the right and the video will play in a new window.

Finding out about what you really want from yourself

This is a great video and this lady is going through a moment that we have all been through or should go through. The Myers Briggs personality test can help you. But as the video shows its not just about the job its about life, what do you want to achieve over the next 60 years.

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Questionnaire

In order for you to assess what you know about this health area, we suggest using a questionnaire. This might help you understand your situation in this area, or taking it might improve your understanding of the area.

You may be able to take this questionnaire online – either here on our site or on an external site – or download it and complete it on paper – it depends on copyright (and whether we’ve managed to build it on our site!).

The ways you can take a questionnaire:

External site questionnaire

Take questionnaire on external site

You can take this questionnaire on at least one external site.

Does your job actually works well with your personality?

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) test may be able to help. The MBTI test has been used by businesses and professionals for decades to decide if a candidate is right for a position. In fact, roughly 80% of Fortune 500 companies use the test to vet potential employees.  It is used by businesses to determine employee preferences, it sorts people according to the following eight characteristics:

Extraversion (E) or Introversion (I)
Sensing (S) or Intuitive (N)
Feeling (F) or Thinking (T)
Judging (J) or Perceiving (P)

This gives you a 4 letter code, and there are 16 different personality types.  Although the official test at the Myers Briggs Foundations costs money, you can take a test at the url shown which gives an indication of your type.  Take the test and work out what type you are.  You can have a summary emailed to you, and you can buy a more in depth report if you want.

Then, once you have obtained your type, you can look on the sites listed below to see which jobs are thought to fit best with each type.

Indeed have a list here

Make It from CNBC

Workopolis have a list of best jobs based on the MBTI

BusinessInsider have a similar list

Novoresume have a list

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All areas of health are interlinked

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Find your initial focus

You might think that physical, financial and mental health are quite separate, and for some people they are. However, often a problem in one area has a knock-on effect on others. Losing your job can lead to anxiety and depression, which can turn you to drink and impact your health.

You might have a severe issue in one area but that can lead to problems in other areas, and the people treating you for the first problem won’t be equipped to deal with these linked issues.

For example, doctors and nurses can treat you for a physical problem but can’t advise you about your job or finances.  Nor for the anxiety that comes with it, apart from prescribing some drugs, which might or might not be the best solution.

We encourage you to take a holistic view – we look at all areas and offer support across the whole spectrum.

health areas interlinked

Even this view of health is simplistic, as you’ll discover later if you go down that route.  You might want to consider overall health, or wellness or wellbeing, which include additional types of health, such as occupational health (how you are in your job).   Then there’s happiness and quality of life – how do these fit?

If you’re interested in that, click the link here to see more information.

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Health Areas in Domains

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Domains

We break down the overall concept of health or wellness into ‘bite-sized chunks’ that we can actually do something about.  The first level we call health domains. 

We like the Life of Wellness site and we have chosen the following domains.

1. Emotional Wellness: Awareness and acceptance of feelings
2. Spiritual Wellness: A search for meaning and purpose
3. Intellectual Wellness: Recognition of your creativity, knowledge and skills
4. Physical Wellness: Need for physical activity and balanced nutrition
5. Environmental Wellness: Positive awareness and impact on your environment
6. Financial Wellness: Debt reduction, cash flow balance or financial future planning
7. Occupational Wellness: Personal achievement and enrichment from your career
8. Social Wellness: Contribution to your community

Health Areas

Within each domain, we have included a number of health areas. These are specific issues that you can tackle.  Within each health area, e.g. Depression, we have built additional information and exercises which you can do to help in the area. You can create your own Action Plan to address this area, and see

Emotional: Anxiety, Compassion Fatigue, Depression, Gambling, Laughter, Narcissistic, Personality Disorder, Sleep, Stress

Environmental: Environmental Issues, Greenness

Financial: Debt, Family Finance, Financial Planning, Financial Wellness

Intellectual: IQ, Personality, Procrastination

Occupational: Jobs for Different Personality Types, Retirement Income, Work Life Balance

Physical: Alcohol, Disabilities, Dizziness, Drugs, Fitness, Food Preferences, General Health, Healthy Ageing, Illness, Nutrition, Sleep Apnea, Smoking

Social: Communication Skills, Communication Styles, Domestic Abuse, Emotional Abuse, Love Partnerships, Mental Abuse, Parenting Styles, Sexual Addiction

Spiritual: Are You Sensitive, Mystical Guidance, Spirituality

Each health area has supporting information and its own questionnaire.

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Understand Health

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Physical, financial and mental health

One definition of health is:

Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. 

The NHS define health as: ‘We use a broad definition of health that encompasses both physical and mental health, as well as wellbeing. This means we are not only interested in whether or not people are ill or have a health condition, but also in how healthy and well they are.’

We believe we also have to consider financial health, as this can easily impact physical and mental health. Click the button to see an example of how these are connected.

 It gets more complicated…

What is Health? How about Wellness, Wellbeing or Happiness?

The Active Wellbeing Society (TAWS) define Health as a state of the overall mental and physical state of a person; the absence of disease. They define Wellbeing or wellness as a way of life that aims to enhance well-being and refers to a more holistic whole-of-life experience which also includes emotional and spiritual aspects of life.  We expand on this definition of health to include financial health and mental health, to make it synonymous with wellbeing or wellness.  

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Health domains

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We break down the overall concept of health or wellness into ‘bite-sized chunks’ that we can actually do something about.  The first level we call health domains.

We like the Life of Wellness site and we have chosen the following domains.

1. Emotional Wellness: Awareness and acceptance of feelings
2. Spiritual Wellness: A search for meaning and purpose
3. Intellectual Wellness: Recognition of your creativity, knowledge and skills
4. Physical Wellness: Need for physical activity and balanced nutrition
5. Environmental Wellness: Positive awareness and impact on your environment
6. Financial Wellness: Debt reduction, cash flow balance or financial future planning
7. Occupational Wellness: Personal achievement and enrichment from your career
8. Social Wellness: Contribution to your community

wellness wheel

Health Areas

Within each domain, we have included a number of health areas. These are specific issues that you can tackle.  Within each health area, e.g. Depression, once you have subscribed we have built additional information and exercises which you can do to help in the area.

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See which domains you should address

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Having established that we use 8 domains, you need to understand which you should concentrate on.

The 8 are:

  • Emotional
  • Environmental
  • Financial
  • Intellectual
  • Occupational
  • Physical
  • Social
  • Spiritual

 

You can take a questionnaire, which scores you in each domain.  You can decide which domains you are strong in, and which you need to improve.

Another analysis shows which domains you should look at, but also which domains you want to look at.

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Locus of Control

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  • We want to help people in all aspects of their health  – physical, financial and mental. We also provide detailed explanations of how overall health (or well-being) is measured.
  • We believe these things are often linked, so we try and address health holistically. We are building templates, questionnaires and exercises to help you identify what’s important to you.
  • We think people should try and take responsibility for  of their own health as much as they can.  See below for what that means.

People look at things differently.  Some people believe things happen to them, while others believe they can influence what happens to them. Technically this is called the ‘locus of control’.  People can have an Internal or external Locus of Control

So how do you see things?

Psychology Today have a 15 minute test which gives you a summary of your position you can buy the detailed results if you want to.

My Personality Test have a 10 minute test which gives you a summary.

People tend to take more responsibility (locus gets more internal) as they get older.  However, external isn’t always bad – for example if you are physically unable to do some things you can accept it and focus on the things you can do.  This American video explains the concept and gives examples of how this can affect relationships.

locus of control

Internal

  • More likely to take responsibility for actions
  • Tend to be less influenced by others

External

  • Blame outside forces for what happens
  • Don’t believe they can change their situation themselves

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Add your attitude to change - see how you view changes in your life

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Do you need to change?

No matter how healthy you are at the moment, the chances are that there are some areas you could improve. It may be that you have a real problem in one or more areas, and you would like to make some improvements.

At YouDrive we accept that there are many different degrees of ‘not wellness’ in a large number of different health areas, ranging from physical illness such as covid-19 through mental illness such as anxiety through to financial problems like debt.  We try and help where the problem ranges from ‘slight’ to quite bad’ – after this expert help and intervention may be needed.

However, especially in these times, we have to try and make these changes ourselves, possibly with some help from others, whether remotely or face to face.

The thing is, to make an improvement we have to change some things.

This involves changing our behaviour in some respects, and that’s not always easy.

Henry Ford, the creator of the assembly line, is quoted as saying “if you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you’ve always got”.  

henry ford

Another way of looking at this: “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.” – attributed to Albert Einstein.

Consequently we need to make some changes.  The problem is that we have already developed a lot of habits, some of which we need to break and replace by better ones.  Some of our bad habits have become entrenched, and the bad results they create in turn engender further bad habits to develop – in effect the bad habits can feed on themselves.

We need to understand how we can make changes and stick to them, and that’s what this part of your health profile is about.

It will involve some learning, through reading, some videos and some additional information and also seeing how you react to change currently.

It will also ask you to consider whether you feel you are in charge of your future, or whether you feel it’s all fate.

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Assess your overall health using a health questionnaire

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At YouDrive we try and help people improve their health. We use ‘health’ but we understand there are other terms such as wellbeing or even happiness that reflect how we are doing in our lives – if you’re interested in the different definitions and ideas see our page on the subject.

We want to help whether you have a particular problem – physical, financial or mental – or if you just want to improve some specific part of your life or just make some improvements overall.

You’d be surprised, but there has been a serious amount of scientific work done in this area over the last twenty years.

So first we allow you to assess your current health (or wellbeing, or happiness).  We do this by questionnaire.  Which one is determined by the type of person you are:

  1. You understand yourself well and want a quick overview of your health and wellness, and will drill down in any areas needing work
  2. You want to do a more detailed assessment and then focus on areas you’re already aware of
  3. You want to look at the whole situation in more detail across all the health domains.

By the way, we take your privacy seriously – we collect information that you choose to provide but we de-identify it as much as possible and will never share it with anyone without your explicit consent.

You can then drill down into some specific areas and there are more questionnaires to see your situation in these particular areas.  We provide you with specific information and refer you to other potential aspects of help. Our next step is to build a personalised action plan – for now we will make a suggestion for you to develop your own plan and then after a time you can see whether this has had a positive impact by retaking the test.

In future we will be engaging with medical and behavioural specialists to devise action plans for individual people with specific situations.

We have an overall questionnaire which you can complete which will assess your current state.

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Values, Attitudes and Beliefs

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We all have our beliefs, attitudes and values – these have developed throughout our life based on who we are and what we have done. Let’s look at what these are.

The University of Reading explain: “People’s values, beliefs and attitudes are formed and bonded over time through the influences of family, friends, society and life experiences. So, by the time you’re an adult, you can hold very definite views on just about everything with a sense of “no one is going to change my mind”.

The combination of your personal values, beliefs and attitudes are your moral principles that guide you in life and affect your behaviour. However, your views can wildly differ to others and in an institution such as a school, these beliefs may be counter to the values of the school, child development or indeed the law.” 

Let’s look more closely at the differences between beliefs, attitudes and values.

Beliefs

These come from real experiences – we think our beliefs are based on reality, but in fact our beliefs colour our experiences; also, an original experience e.g. when we were a child is not the same as what’s happening now. Beliefs can be moral, religious or cultural and reflect who we are. They can be rational (‘it gets colder in winter’) or irrational (‘I am never going to make something of myself’).

Attitudes

This is an immediate belief or disposition about something specific. It is a recurring group of beliefs and behaviours aimed at specific groups, people, ideas or objects. They will normally be positive or negative and we will always behave that way to the target group. Examples of attitudes include confidence (I can or can’t do something), grateful (I an entitled to / grateful for XXX) and cheerful (I am generally happy / miserable).

Values

These are things (principles or qualities) that we hold in high regard or consider to be worthwhile or right / wrong. They are formed by a belief related to the worth of something – an idea or behaviour. Some values are common (e.g. family comes first, the value of friendship) or cultural (which the whole community have – see video at Study.com here)

The theory

Links to Wikipedia

Expectancy Value Theory suggests you balance your beliefs about something with the value you attach to it. The Theory of Reasoned Action suggests that beliefs and evaluation about behavioural outcomes determine attitudes, and intentions lead directly to behaviour.

Beliefs

Expressions of confidence – can change over time

Attitudes

Learned predispositions to something – are subject to change

Values

Ideals that guide our behaviour – Generally long lasting and often need life changing experience to change

Iceberg demonstrating implicit and explicit bias – from Owlcation

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A Butterfly Life: 4 Keys to More Happiness, Better Health and Letting Your True Self Shine

Times of change can be a challenge, no doubt! Whether it’s a relationship breakup, job loss, or being diagnosed with a serious health issue. Or you may WANT things to be different, but it feels a little scary or overwhelming. The butterfly reminds us change can be beautiful, even necessary, in order to realize our full potential and live our best life.